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We are in turbulent times with the mass chaos that is going on in the world. This year got off to a rocky start with news of fires that were quickly engulfing Australia. We witnessed the death of the great Kobe Bryant, who will forever be missed by his loved ones and fans. The world came to a halt due to a pandemic, something that we were not prepared for. In the middle of this, we are brought to the movement that has been sweeping the world, the movement to stop systemic racism. An issue that has long plagued our home and has often gone unspoken. We have seen peaceful protests, and we have seen riots. We have seen tears shed for the loved ones that were killed due to their skin color. When will it end?

Racism has long been felt through this country for years. Long before a man walked into a convenience store with a counterfeit $20 bill, he may have had no idea counterfeit. Other deaths, such as Tamir Rice (2014), Laquan McDonald (2014), John Crawford (2014), Freddie Gray (2015), Travon Martin (2012), were all killed for no reason. These deaths and others have sparked the movement ignited through almost every state and several countries. We have brought the movement for equality back to the light. 

Sadly, schools often worry more about teaching unrelated events than teaching about essential topics such as racial equality. A lesson created by ADL discusses how high schools should provide more opportunities for students to learn about the Black Lives Matter Movement and the history that surrounds it. They discuss how students can analyze the controversy around politicians using the phrase “All Lives Matter” as opposed to “Black Lives Matter.” 

It is a huge message that we must teach not just students but our peers, that all lives can’t matter until black lives matter. Our Pledge of Allegiance states, “with Liberty and Justice for all,” a phrase that should encompass us all. We should be fighting for justice for all people—justice for those that have lost their lives for no reason.